Category Archives: fruits and vegetables

Recipe of the Week

Pan de Elote

Pan de Elote

Pan de Elote is a type of Mexican cornbread that’s slightly sweet and way more creamy and custardy than it’s American counterpart. This recipe is a variation of my both my mom and Lesley Tellez’s version in the Mija Chronicles. My mom’s original recipe was adapted from one of Josefina Velasquez de Leon’s cookbooks.

(From the 1930s to 1960s de Leon wrote and published around 140 cookbooks, opened a popular cooking school, was regularly interviewed on the radio, and had her own TV show. My grandmother was an early student of hers.)

4 cups fresh corn
1 1/2 sticks butter
1 cup sugar
5 eggs, separated
6 tablespoons flour
pinch salt

Preheat oven to 350° F.

Place the corn in a food processor and puree until smooth. Set aside.

In the bowl of a standing mixer equipped with the paddle attachment, cream the butter and sugar. With machine running, add the egg yolks one at a time, incorporating each before adding the next.

Add the corn puree, flour and pinch salt and mix until combined.

In a separate bowl, beat the egg whites until they form stiff peaks.

Gently fold the beaten whites into the corn batter and pour into a buttered 9-inch round or square pan. Bake for about 45 minutes or until a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean. Serve warm or at room temperature.

Serves 8 to 10

Recipe of the Week

Onion Custard

Onion Custard

Malinda Russell’s “A Domestic Cook Book” of 1866 is the first cookbook published by an African American woman. A treasure of American history, its 39-pages provide a peek into the lives of free African Americans during the Civil War and reveal that there was so much more to Southern cooking than “soul food.” This elegant Onion Custard recipe is delicious evidence.

“Pare and boil twelve large onions; mash when cooked soft, and strain through a sieve; stir in, while hot, 1-4th of a lb of butter; beat half a lb sugar with the yolks of six eggs; stir into the sugar three tablespoons flour, one pint of rich cream; stir all together until smooth; on tablespoon cinnamon, half spoon cloves, stir well; beat the whites of the eggs, and stir it in last; paste your pans with rich pastry; bake in a quick oven.” – Malinda Russell

This recipe below is a simplified, unsweetened version of Russell’s recipe.

2 tablespoons butter
2 small yellow onions, minced (about 2 cups)
salt and pepper
4 egg yolks
1 ½ cup milk or cream
pinch nutmeg

Preheat oven to 325° F. In a medium skillet, melt butter. Add onions and cook until soft, translucent, and they begin to caramelize, about 10 minutes. Stir in salt and pepper. Taste, adjust seasoning, remove from heat and cool slightly.

In a medium bowl, whisk egg yolks with milk, pinch nutmeg, salt and pepper.

Divide the onions evenly among six 4-ounce ramekins. Evenly divide the custard mixture and sprinkle with Parmesan cheese, if desired.

Place in a large baking pan with 2-inch sides. Pour enough boiling water in pan to come halfway up sides of ramekins and transfer to oven. Bake until custards are just set, about 30 to 45 minutes. Remove ramekins from hot water bath and serve warm.

Serves 6

Cream of California Herbs

Cream of California Herbs

“California’s climate is just right for a lot of things, including herbs. They all flourish here, though one has to get pretty north to have luck with chervil, I admit.” – from Helen Evan Brown’s “West Coast Cook Book” of 1952

Brown’s recipe is thickened with egg yolks. This recipe has potatoes to add a little creaminess.

2 tablespoons butter
2 shallots, minced
3 baby potatoes, peeled and diced
6 cups chicken stock
2 cups parsley
1 cup basil leaves
½ cup cilantro leaves
2 tablespoons tarragon leaves
1 tablespoon lemon juice
salt and pepper

Melt the butter in a large saucepan. Add the shallots and cook over low heat until softened, about 5 minutes. Add the potatoes and chicken stock and bring to a boil. Cover and simmer over low heat until the potatoes are tender, about 10 minutes.

Add the parsley, basil, cilantro and tarragon to the soup. Working in batches, puree the soup in a blender, or puree using an immersion blender. Return the soup to the saucepan, add the lemon juice and season to taste with salt and pepper. Add a dollop of crème fraiche to each bowl and serve.

Serves 6

Alegrías

Alegrías

In the Aztec diet, amaranth was second in importance only to corn. In festivals to honor the gods, toasted amaranth grain was mixed with maize, honey, and sometimes blood and shaped into idols of gods before being paraded through the streets, “sacrificed” into pieces, and distributed among the crowd to be eaten.

The conquistadors regarded this practice as a blasphemous parody of the Christian communion and outlawed its cultivation. Today these honeyed sweets, called tzoalli in Nahuatl by the ancient Aztecs, are known as alegrías, the Spanish word for happiness.

¼ cup amaranth seeds
¼ cup pumpkin seeds, toasted
2 tablespoons raisins
3 tablespoons honey
½ teaspoon lime juice
pinch salt

Pop the amaranth. Heat a skillet over medium-high heat. Place a tablespoon of amaranth into the bottom of the dry pan, and cover with a lid. Turn off the heat and shake pot vigorously to keep the amaranth from sticking. After 20 seconds or so the amaranth should be popped. It’s ok if there are some un-popped grains. Pour the popped amaranth into a bowl. Repeat until all the amaranth is popped.

Mix the pumpkin seeds and raisins with the popped amaranth.

Place the honey in a saucepan. Heat over medium, mixing well, until a syrup forms. Mix in the lime juice and salt. Turn off heat.

Pour the amaranth mixture into the syrup and mix quickly so that the mixture absorbs the syrup. Pour onto a pan lined with parchment paper and press to flatten. Place another sheet of parchment over the amaranth and flatten to smooth the surface.

Let cool until firm and cut into rounds or rectangles.

Makes about 4 pieces