Tag Archives: salmon

Spice-Crusted Salmon

Spice-Crusted Salmon Skewers

Spice-Crusted Salmon

This recipe was prepared in my recent aphrodisiac themed workshops at the J. Paul Getty Museum. The rosy colored salmon is a fish known for its determination, traveling long distances from the sea up rivers and streams to have sex in the very place they were born. It is a sexual powerhouse; perhaps this determination can be passed on to the human consuming it?

2 tablespoons fennel seeds
1 tablespoon coriander seeds
2 teaspoons salt
¼ teaspoon pepper
1 ½ pound salmon
juice of 2 lemons
olive oil

In a mortar and pestle, combine the coriander and fennel seeds. Grind until coriander seed is just broken. Transfer seeds to a small bowl, and toss with 2 teaspoons salt and ¼ teaspoon pepper.

Press the spice mixture into the salmon, evenly coating the flesh side.

Heat a skillet of medium high heat and add 2 tablespoons olive oil. Add the fish to the hot oil, seed side down, and allow to cook until brown, about 3 minutes. Turn over and cook until just opaque in center, about more 3, more depending on the thickness of the fish. Salmon is done when the inner flesh in no longer transparent.

Transfer salmon to a serving platter, drizzle with lemon juice and serve warm or at room temperature.

(The salmon pictured about was cut into 1 ½-inch pieces, seared, and served as an appetizer.)

Serves 6

photo by Carin Krasner

Paletas de Sandia con Mango (Watermelon Mango Popsicles)

paleta sandia

Paletas de Sandia con Mango (Watermelon Mango Popsicles)

Watermelons and mangos, two of the most delicious fruits in the world, are used staples in Mexico. You can find them sliced with chile and lime, in aguas frescas, and in popsicles. Surprising, neither fruit is native to Latin American. Watermelons were brought to Mexico on African slave ships and mangos are native to India.

8 cups cubed watermelon, seeds removed (about 3 pounds of watermelon)
3 mangoes, peeled and cubes
½ cup coconut water

Place the watermelon, mango cubes and coconut water in a blender and process until smooth. (You may have to work in batches.) Put in the popsicle molds and freeze.

Makes 2 dozen

Grilled Cedar Plank Salmon with Old Bay

cedar plank salmon

Grilled Cedar Plank Salmon with Old Bay

Another great summer recipe, this one is seasoned with Old Bay, my husband’s favorite seasoning.

According to Saveur Magazine, Old Bay was created by Gustav Brunn, a German Jewish spice merchant who was arrested and sent to a concentration camp in 1938. His wife somehow managed to secure his release and the Brunns sailed for America, spice grinder in hand.

The family ended up in Baltimore where he was hired at McCormick spice company. Three days later – when they realized he didn’t speak English – he was fired, and decided to go into business by himself. By 1940 the savory blend – which screams summer – was born.

Brunn sold his company to Smith Corona Machines in 1985 and in 1990 the McCormick Company acquired and still holds the secret recipe for Old Bay. Brunn’s original recipe which is a combination of celery, salt, mustard, pepper, bay leaves, cloves, pimento, ginger, mace, cardamom, cinnamon and paprika, has never changed.

1 1/2 pounds salmon
juice of 2 lemons
1 tablespoon olive oil
Old Bay seasoning

Soak cedar plank in water for 1 to 2 hours.

Prepare grill to medium-high heat.

Rub the flesh side of the salmon with lemon juice and olive and drizzle generously with Old Bay. Let stand at room temperature for 15 minutes.

Put salmon on the plank, skin side down and grill, covered, until salmon is cooked through and the edges are browned, about 15 minutes.

Serves 4 to 6

Baked Salmon with Mustard Crème Fraiche

salmon with mustard creme fraiche

Baked Salmon with Mustard Crème Fraiche

Mustard cultivation is ancient; the Greek writer Herodotus mentioned mustard as a cultivated plant in the 5th century BC. It has always been important in Europe because it grows locally therefore making it the most inexpensive of the spices. The first sizable commercial mustard businesses arose in the mid-14th century around Dijon, France.

1 1⁄2 pound salmon
2 tablespoons olive oil
salt and pepper
1⁄2 cup crème fraiche
2 tablespoons Dijon mustard
2 tablespoons whole grain mustard
zest of one lemon
juice of one lemon
fresh thyme and lemon slices for garnish

Preheat the oven to 450° F .

Place the fish on a sheet pan lined with parchment paper. Drizzle with olive oil and season to taste with salt and pepper. Bake for 10 to 15 minutes, depending on the thickness of your fish.

While the salmon cooks, prepare the mustard sauce. Stir together the crème fraiche, two mustards, lemon zest and lemon juice and season to taste with salt and pepper.

Serve the salmon warm or at room temperature with a dollop of crème fraiche. Garnish with lemon slices and thyme.

Serves 6